Kilala.nl - Personal website of Tess Sluijter

Unimportant background
Login
  RSS feed

About me

Blog archives

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

> Weblog

> Sysadmin articles

> Maths teaching

<< 10 / 2019

"If it were easy, I wouldn't be doing this"

2019-11-18 20:59:00

bob ross

... That's what I told my classmate B. (their ballet blog is here) tonight: "if it were easy, I wouldn't be doing this." That's what I honestly believe: I often do things because they're a challenge. Hence why I kind of live by Bob Ross' quote shown to the left.

Or as Nobel laureate Craig Mello put it: "Ask yourself: “are you having fun?”. And sometimes it’s not fun, but there’s something at the back of your mind maybe saying: “if I can just figure this out”, you know? And when you do, finally do make sense of that thing, man! It’s so much better because it was hard!"

So, what are B., our classmates and myself learning?

Ballet.

I am learning ballet and have been for a few months now. I'm an uncoordinated ditz, struggling with basics, but I'm loving it even when I'm hating it. The hating is short and momentary, the loving is something that sticks. 


kilala.nl tags: , ,

View or add comments (curr. 0)

In many cases, just cramming for an exam won't work

2019-11-18 20:44:00

Today, someone on Reddit posted the following question

"I have the [...] practice exams, I typed the entire [...] video course from YouTube and I just brought the exam cram book but no matter how much I study I don’t retain anything. Do you guys have tips?"

OP ran into the wall that is learning styles: cramming simply doesn't work for everybody! I'm no expert by any means, but I did explain the following:

It is entirely possible that your current method simply does not suit your personal learning style! If you start poking around the web a little bit, researching learning styles, you will find very quickly that there are many different methods!

You can try and keep brute-forcing your learning the way you have right now, but maybe that will simply not get the results you want. Why not have a think about your days in primary, middle and high school? What did the classes you did best in have in common?

Perhaps you're someone who simply needs something else than quiet self-study, taking notes while listening to a teacher.

Personally I have found that I put great importance on putting new information into context. I don't want to learn floating, individual topics, I want to put them into a context that I'm already familiar with, or build a context around them. This helps me better understand the new material's place. One thing that could help you with this is making mind maps.

Or perhaps you're someone who better learns by doing then by hearing. I understand that playing around with new tools and concepts in a lab can take a lot of time, but there's a reason why many books include lab exercises for the reader. It is often said that people learn <20% by hearing and >50% by doing.

Finally, it is also often said that one way to solidify and test your understanding of a subject, is to explain the topic to somebody else. If you can explain X or Y to a friend, your partner or a rubber ducky, then you can be sure that you've come to a proper understanding. Or perhaps you will find a few gaps in your knowledge that you need to fill out. Either way, it's a win-win.

 


kilala.nl tags: ,

View or add comments (curr. 0)

Zine: "The tale of the Dubious Crypto", a pentesting adventure

2019-11-08 16:15:00

A broken padlock

If you've met me IRL, you will most likely have seen me doodling or drawing. It's an almost compulsory thing for me! I've often said that drawing is like my brain's "Idle Process", running in the background making sure I pay attention to things around me, like meetings or phone calls.

Over the past 30+ years I've mostly drawn for my own enjoyment, though I've also published yonkoma comics about my daily life and even tried my hand at a short story or two. In 2019 things took a new turn after b0rk (Julia) and SailorHG (Amy) inspired me to make a "zine".

To sum it up, a "zine" (short for magazine) is a self-published booklet about subject matter that's dear to the author's heart. The Public have a made a wonderful zine explaining zines (how meta!), which is available here: An Introduction To Zines.

For starters, I'll write about things I've learned during my work and studies which I feel are well-worth sharing with others. The first issue, "The tale of the Dubious Crypto" covers Windows security practices and bad cryptography implementations in a piece of software I pen-tested.

You can find all upcoming releases, including printing instructions and license information, over here -> https://github.com/tsluyter/Zines


kilala.nl tags: , ,

View or add comments (curr. 0)

<< 10 / 2019