Kilala.nl - Personal website of Thomas Sluyter

Unimportant background
Login
  RSS feed

About me

Blog archives

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

> Weblog

> Sysadmin articles

> Maths teaching

<< 10 / 2009 12 / 2009 >>

FoxT BoKS: changing a (root) user's password

2009-11-18 07:45:00

Speaking of over thinking things...

Recently I've been working on my script for the mass changing of root passwords, right? After working on it for a few days I've found three four five ways of changing a (root) user's password.

1. passwd $HOST:root

2. modbks -l $HOST:root -p "$ENCPASSWD"

3. boksauth -c FUNC=change_psw ... NEWPSW="$PASSWD"

4. boksauth -c FUNC=write TAB=1 ... +PSW="$ENCPASSWD"

5. restbase -s 1 ... $UPDATEFILE

Options 1 and 3 both use the plain text password string, where option 1 is obviously not useful for mass password changes because it's an interactive command. On the other hand options 2 and 4 both use the encrypted password string, thus creating the need for an encryption routine like Perl's "print crypt" method.

Options 3 and 4 are kludges because you're using the "boksauth" command to send calls directly to the servc process as if you were a piece of BoKS client software.

Option 5 is just too nasty to consider. Using the "restbase" command you can restore or overwrite parts of the BoKS database from plain text files in the BoKS dump ("dumpbase") format. This means that you could technically speaking make an update file containing an edited entry for the user in question, containing the new encrypted password string in the PSW field.

In my script I originally used option 2, but was dissatisfied with it because it did not update the PSWLASTCHANGE field in table 1. This in turn was screwing up our SOx audits, because all of our root passwords were listed as being over a year old which obviously wasn't true. This is why I switched to using "boksauth" and option 3.

And that's where the over thinking comes into the story. I don't know why both I and the guys from FoxT didn't think of this, but let's check the "modbks" man-page:

-L days = Set password last change date back days days.

Hooray for reading comprehension! /o/

This means that by simply adding "-L 0" to my modbks command I could've reset the PSWLASTCHANGE field to today. And it works for both BoKS 6.0 and BoKS 6.5. How did I miss this? I think I just need to sit down and read all BoKS man-pages because who knows what else I can come up with? :)


kilala.nl tags: , ,

View or add comments (curr. 1)

FoxT BoKS: forcing a user to change his password

2009-11-18 07:19:00

Sometimes I think too far out of the box :)

I have always been up front about what I think about FoxT's BoKS security software: it's good stuff, but sometimes it's a bit kludgy. Today I learned that I shouldn't let this cloud my judgment too much because sometimes BoKS -does- do things elegantly ^_^;

A colleague of mine asked me the following question: Is it possible to force a user to change his password on the next login, -without- using the web interface?.

Seems straightforward enough, right? However, in my clouded mindset I completely over thought the whole matter and started digging in the database. Table 1 of the BoKS database should contain the relevant information, but which field could it be? Two fields seem to stand out, but neither is related.

BoKS > dumpbase -t1 | grep ru13rs

RLOGNAME="SECURITY:thomas" UID="1000" GID="1000" PROFILE="SecuritySupport" REALNAME="Thomas Sluyter" HOMEDIR="thomas" USERLASTCHANGE="1224244960" FLAGS="16384" PSW="39ajnasdlfkj4" PSWLASTCHANGE="1256545622" NO_PWDF="0" SERIAL="" PSWKEY="6436" LASTTTY="servera:pts/17" LASTLOGIN="1258524725" LASTLOGOUT="1258465492" RETRY="0" RESERVED1="125196" RESERVED2="" LOGINVALIDTIME="0" PSWVALIDTIME="0" CHPSWTIME="0" PSWMINLEN="0" PSWFORCE="0" PSWHISTLEN="0" CHPSWFREQ="0" TIMEOUT="0" TTIMEOUT="0" TDAYS="0" TSTART="0" TEND="0" RETRYMAX="0" CONCUR_LOGINS="0" SHELL="/bin/ksh" PARAMETERMASK="16384" PSDPSW="" PSDPSWLASTCHANGE="0" PSDPSWRETRIES="0" PSDBLOCKED="0" PSDBLOCKEDTIME="0" FEK="" GEKVER="" MD5DN="" LASTDTLOGIN="0" SETTINGVER=""

I've no clue what the NO_PWDF field does, but at least it does NOT stand for "no password force" :) Also, the field PSWFORCE does indeed have something to do with the enforcing of passwords, but not with the forced changing thereof. Instead it defines which guidelines and rules a new password must adhere to (see page 262 of the BoKS 6.5 admin guide). In the end our friendly FoxT support engineer informed me that the value I was looking for is a hex code that's part of the FLAGS field.

However, that's not why I over thought things.

In his email the engineer also showed how he derived the appropriate hex value from the FLAGS field, which led to:

BoKS > man passwd

boksadm -S passwd [-f|-F] [-x debug level] [user]

-f This option forces the user to enter a new password on the next login. Valid for superuser only.

Duh!

EDIT:

Obviously you can also use modbks -l $USER -L $DAYS to set the PSWLASTCHANGE field for the user back X amount of days past the PSWVALIDTIME. However, this isn't very practical since the PSWVALIDTIME field differs per user :)

You'd also be messing with information that could be important to a SOx audit, so you'd better not do it this way ;)


kilala.nl tags: , ,

View or add comments (curr. 0)

Unixerius is now official partner of FoxT

2009-11-05 07:08:00

FoxT's logo

I am proud to announce that my employer, Unixerius, is FoxT's official partner for the Benelux, starting per November 2009. We will be FoxT's preferred partner for the delivery of:

* BoKS Access Control licenses

* Pre-sales consulting

* After-sales consulting

* Implementation projects

* Daily management of BoKS infrastructures

* Training

It took us a year of lobbying, from planting the initial thought in my boss's head to getting the final signature on paper. I'm very glad that we finally managed to get the title and am looking very much forward to working with FoxT on improving both their market in the Netherlands as well as the product itself.


kilala.nl tags: , ,

View or add comments (curr. 1)

Obvious security hole in jail broken iPhones exploited

2009-11-02 17:02:00

Seriously, this was waiting to happen: Teenager "hacks" jail broken iPhones. The security hole is glaringly obvious and has been proven and verified by some of my security-expert acquaintances. And now, obviously, it's out in the open. Personally I wonder how the heck it took so long for this to happen.

The hole: jail broken iPhones often run an SSH daemon, allowing their owners access to the phone's operating system. Most of these owners unfortunately never change the default root password, thus giving anyone 100% access to their phones. I really don't understand why nobody has ever pushed this issue before.

The steps are painfully easy.

1. Do a port scan on T-Mobile's 3G IP range, looking for SSH servers.

2. Try to login as root using the default alpine password.

3. Install your root kit / malware / hostage message.

4. Ask that people send you five euros for the free "fix".

5. PROFIT!

The fix in question is also plainly, fscking obvious: change your root password (asshole)! The "hacker" in question says it's safe to just remove two files he installed and to change your password, but personally I'd do a completely clean wipe. There's no telling if anyone's left anything else as a present.

Some links:

* The topic at GoT that started it all.

* The news post at Tweakers.

* The original hostage website

* The "fix"

EDIT:

My pessimistic prediction for this week: the mainstream press will pick up on the story, misunderstand the issue and put the blame on Apple. Many geeks will try to diffuse the situation and explain that the fault lies with people who were mucking with things they don't understand, but their pleas will fall on deaf ears.

EDIT 2:

So I was wrong in one regard: this exploit -has- both been abused and reported before. How about December 2008 and July 2008? So, the only thing all of this really proves is that people in general don't listen and they don't learn.


kilala.nl tags: , ,

View or add comments (curr. 5)

<< 10 / 2009 12 / 2009 >>